CSA News

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Greetings CSA Members-

Today, Wednesday August 19th is a CSA share pick up. Please plan on picking up your share at your chosen pick up location between 4pm-7pm.

We look forward to seeing you tonight.

Farmer Anne

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Notes From the Field
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Cucumbers

Above: Mountains of cucumbers are coming in from the fields this week.

It is upon us.  What?  You ask.  The gigantic tomato harvest!  It is fair game now to try to hit our fellows with rotten tomatoes in the fields which makes for the ultimate harvest.  We have all endured the splat and now find ourselves emptying half a pint of cherry tomatoes into our hands as an arsenal  so enter the field with caution!

Enjoy this bounty of summer as the days begin to shorten and a breeze begins autumnal daydreams. 

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CSA Survey If you haven't gotten a chance to fill out our annual CSA survey, we'd be grateful if you'd take 5 minutes to answer our questions and let us know your thoughts. We love the suggestions you give us each season, and they've led to many positive changes in our CSA program. Thanks in advance! CSA Survey Link

 

 

In Your Share This Week
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  • carrots
  • chard
  • cucumbers
  • eggplant (BFM only)
  • cippolini onions
  • summer squash
  • sweet corn
  • tomatoes
  • Fruit Share: peaches
  • Coffee Share: week 6/10
  • Bread Share: week 6/10
  • Flower Share: week 10/15
  • Coming Next Week: beans, zucchini, greens, carrots, peaches and more!

 

Recipes
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*Recipe Chef Marilyn was sampling last week

For more recipes please check out our CSA Recipe webpage.

 

Exciting This Week
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TomatoesProduce by the Case We know many of you are busy planning your canning projects. We have case discounts available. Current pricing is:

  • Peaches $45/20# case
  • Cucumbers $17/10# case
  • Tomatoes (red slicers) $40/20#case
  • Zucchini $17/10# case

Just email us and we'll set aside a case or two for you to pick up in the store.

 

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Farm Store CardFarm Store Card If you're planning on stocking up on produce for preserving, or filling your freezer with meat, our farm store card might be a great option to help you save money on all of your purchases. Purchase a $500 Farm Store card and receive %10 off each purchase at our store. It works like a gift card, but saves you money every time you use it. Stop in the store to pick one up.

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Mangalitsa PorkComing this Weekend... Mangalitsa Pork! We have a brand new round of pork cuts that will be available in the farm store this weekend from our Mangalitsa pigs. Our pork is pastured and gmo-free.

 

Words to Live By
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"It's difficult to think anything but pleasant thoughts while eating a homegrown tomato."

                                        -Lewis Grizzard

 

Around the Farm
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Gracie with Cucumber

Gracie with one of the monster cucumbers we harvested this week.

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  10 year anniversary!

Cure Organic Farm

7416 Valmont Rd.
Boulder, CO 80301
cureorganicfarm@yahoo.com
www.cureorganicfarm.com

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Recipes
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Calabacitas from Chef Marilyn's blog The Cook and the Farmer

CalabacitasCalabacitas is a great way to use up much of this week's share!

Use summer vegetables in any proportion you like. Chop them into a medium cut (about 1/2″) keeping separate so you can add them to the pan longest cooking to shortest. I like to use (in cooking order) onion, peppers (sweet and/or hot), garlic (finely chopped), summer squash, tomato and fresh corn cut from the cob. I keep the seasonings mild to let the vegetable flavors shine, adding only salt, pepper and/or chile flakes, fresh or dried oregano or marjoram (preferred), bay leaves, cilantro stems and leaves at the end. For a heavier spice profile, you could also add freshly ground cumin and/or coriander. Use a wider than deep pan that will accommodate all the vegetables and allow lots of evaporation so there's just a little juice by the end of cooking. Over medium to medium-high heat, melt your fat(s) or oil of choice and start cooking your vegetables. As each one partially cooks, add the next. Add a little salt and the seasonings early in the cooking, then taste and add salt as you continue to add vegetables but under salt until the end. By the time you add the last, they will only need a short time to finish so that everything is tender but not mushy, and most of the juice has reduced. For an added flourish sprinkle the top with chopped squash blossoms and cilantro and then grated cheese. Cover with the lid or run under a pre-heated broiler to melt the cheese. Serve as a side dish, or with pinto beans or an egg for a vegetarian meal. Calabacitas makes a complete meal topped with a fried egg.

 



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Grilled Eggplant adapted from Real Simple

2 tablespoons canola oil, plus more for the grill

2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce

2 medium eggplant (about 1 pound), cut into 1/2-inch-thick rounds

2 tablespoons rice vinegar

1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh ginger

1 jalapeño, seeded and thinly sliced

1/2 cup fresh cilantro

  1. Heat grill to medium-high.
  2. In a small bowl, combine the oil and 1 tablespoon soy sauce. Brush the eggplant with it and season with ¼ teaspoon each salt and pepper.
  3. Oil grill. Grill the eggplant until the eggplant is tender and slightly charred, 3 to 5 minutes per side.
  4. In a second small bowl, combine the vinegar, ginger, jalapeño, cilantro, and remaining soy sauce. Drizzle over the eggplant before serving.

 

 

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Cold Brined Zucchini Pickles adapted from Food 52 (this is what Chef Marilyn was sampling last week)

    • 1 pound zucchini
    • 1 small onion
    • 2 tablespoons salt, a little more if using kosher
    • 2 cups cider vinegar
    • 1 cup sugar
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons dry mustard
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons crushed yellow and/or brown mustard seeds
    • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric

    1. Wash and trim the zucchini, then slice them lengthwise into 1/16-inch-thick slices on a mandoline. (You could slice them crosswise, too, but Zuni's are lengthwise.) Slice the onion very thinly as well. Combine the zucchini and onions in a large but shallow non-reactive bowl or casserole dish, add the salt, and toss to distribute. Add a few ice cubes and cold water to cover, then stir to dissolve the salt.
    2. After about 1 hour, taste and feel a piece of zucchini—it should be slightly softened. Drain and pat dry.
    3. Meanwhile, combine the vinegar, sugar, dry mustard, mustard seeds, and turmeric in a small saucepan and simmer for 3 minutes. Set aside until just warm to the touch. If the brine is too hot, it will cook the vegetables and make the pickles soft instead of crisp.
    4. Transfer the zucchini and onion pieces to three two-cup canning vessels (or the equivalent) and pour over the cooled brine. Seal tightly and refrigerate for at least a day before serving to allow the flavors to mellow and permeate the zucchini. They'll last for a week in the fridge.

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Gazpacho adapted from Ina Garten

    1 slicing cucumber, halved and seeded, but not peeled
    2 red bell peppers, cored and seeded
    4 small tomatoes
    1 onion
    3 garlic cloves, minced
    23 ounces tomato juice (3 cups)
    1/4 cup white wine vinegar
    1/4 cup good olive oil
    1/2 tablespoon kosher salt
    1 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper



    Roughly chop the cucumbers, bell peppers, tomatoes, and red onions into 1-inch cubes. Put each vegetable separately into a food processor fitted with a steel blade and pulse until it is coarsely chopped. Do not overprocess!

    After each vegetable is processed, combine them in a large bowl and add the garlic, tomato juice, vinegar, olive oil, salt, and pepper. Mix well and chill before serving. The longer gazpacho sits, the more the flavors develop.


     

     

 

 

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