Cure Organic Farm CSA Newsletter

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Greetings CSA Members,

This is a reminder that today, Wednesday November 21st is a Winter Share CSA pick-up. Your share will be available from 3pm-6pm at the farm.

We look forward to seeing you tonight,

Farmer Anne

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Exciting This Week!     
Blue Slate Turkey Turkey Tips! By now your bird should be thawed and hopefully brining away to juicy perfection.

Want to see all of Chef Marilyn's tips from last week? Check them out here.

 

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Grilling Your Turkey If you're pressed for oven space on Thanksgiving day, you might want to consider grilling your turkey. Check out this article from Sunset magazine to get the step by step instructions. How to Grill a Perfect Turkey

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In Your Share This Week:
  • apples
  • brussels sprouts
  • carrots
  • celery/celeriac
  • onions
  • potatoes
  • salad greens
  • turnips
  • winter squash
  • Coming Next Week: winter squash
Around the Farm

Wondering what might show up in your winter share in the next few weeks? Take a sneak peek at what's pushing its way up through the soil in our hoop houses.

Fennel in Hoop House

Fennel is neatly tucked away under remay in one of our hoop houses. Fennel has a natural season from fall through early spring. Like many cool weather crops, it gets sweeter as the temperature drops.

Lettuce in the hoop house

Heads of Rouge Hiver winter lettuce are also staying warm and cozy in another hoop house. Rouge Hiver is extremely hardy and can survive temps as low as 5 degrees!

 

 

Coming Up at the Farm:

Farm StoreThanksgiving Week Farm Store Hours This week the Farm Store will be open on Wednesday 11/21 from 11-6, and then will be closed the rest of the week. So stock up on all your holiday week fixins when you come to pick up your share tonight. Happy Thanksgiving!

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                                 Important Dates

  • Last Boulder Farmer's Market 11/17
  • Winter Holiday Market, 12/1 and 12/2 at Boulder County Fairgrounds
  • Farm Store open through Dec. 16th

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Duck

On some holidays, it's good to be a duck. That is, unless you're planning on making Turducken...

Words to Live By:

'Twas the night of Thanksgiving, but I just couldn't sleep.
I tried counting backwards, I tried counting sheep
The leftovers beckoned--The dark meat and white,
But I fought the temptation with all of my might.

Tossing and turning with anticipation,
The thought of a snack became infatuation,
So I raced to the kitchen, flung open the door,
And gazed at the fridge full of goodies galore.
I gobbled up turkey and buttered potatoes,
Pickles and carrots, beans and tomatoes.

I felt myself swelling so plump and so round,
Till all of a sudden, I rose off the ground!

I crashed through the ceiling, floating into the sky,
With a mouthful of pudding and a handful of pie,
But I managed to yell as I soared past the trees,

HAPPY EATING TO ALL!

PASS THE CRANBERRIES PLEASE!

             -Author Unknown

 

 

RECIPES

Pumpkin Stuffed with Everything Good (from Dorie Greenspan, thanks to Marilyn Kakudo)

Makes 2 very generous servings or 4 side servings

1 small pumpkin, about 3 pounds
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1/4 pound stale bread, thinly sliced and cut into 1/2-inch chunks
1/4 pound cheese, such as Gruyère, Emmenthal, cheddar, or a combination, cut into 1/2-inch chunks
2–4 garlic cloves (to taste), split, germ removed, and coarsely chopped
4 slices bacon, cooked until crisp, drained, and chopped
About 1/4 cup snipped fresh chives or sliced scallions
1 tablespoon minced fresh thyme
About 1/3 cup heavy cream
Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg

Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 350F. Line a baking sheet with parchment, or find a Dutch oven with a diameter that's just a tiny bit larger than the pumpkin. If you bake the pumpkin in a casserole, it will keep its shape, but it might stick to the casserole, so you'll have to serve it from the pot—which is an appealingly homey way to serve it. If you bake it on a baking sheet, you can present it freestanding, but maneuvering a heavy stuffed pumpkin with a softened shell isn't so easy. However, since I love the way the unencumbered pumpkin looks in the center of the table, I've always taken my chances with the baked-on-a-sheet method, and so far, I've been lucky.


Using a very sturdy knife—and caution—cut a cap out of the top of the pumpkin (think Halloween Jack-o-Lantern). It's easiest to work your knife around the top of the pumpkin at a 45-degree angle. You want to cut off enough of the top to make it easy for you to work inside the pumpkin. Clear away the seeds and strings from the cap and from inside the pumpkin. Season the inside of the pumpkin generously with salt and pepper, and put it on the baking sheet or in the pot.


Toss the bread, cheese, garlic, bacon, and herbs together in a bowl. Season with pepper—you probably have enough salt from the bacon and cheese, but taste to be sure—and pack the mix into the pumpkin. The pumpkin should be well filled—you might have a little too much filling, or you might need to add to it. Stir the cream with the nutmeg and some salt and pepper and pour it into the pumpkin. Again, you might have too much or too little—you don’t want the ingredients to swim in cream, but you do want them nicely moistened. (It's hard to go wrong here.)


Put the cap in place and bake the pumpkin for about 2 hours—check after 90 minutes—or until everything inside the pumpkin is bubbling and the flesh of the pumpkin is tender enough to be pierced easily with the tip of a knife. Because the pumpkin will have exuded liquid, I like to remove the cap during the last 20 minutes or so, so that the liquid can bake away and the top of the stuffing can brown a little.
When the pumpkin is ready, carefully, very carefully—it's heavy, hot, and wobbly—bring it to the table or transfer it to a platter that you'll bring to the table.


Serving
You have a choice—you can either spoon out portions of the filling, making sure to get a generous amount of pumpkin into the spoonful, or you can dig into the pumpkin with a big spoon, pull the pumpkin meat into the filling, and then mix everything up. I'm a fan of the pull-and-mix option. Served in hearty portions followed by a salad, the pumpkin is a perfect cold-weather main course; served in generous spoonfuls, it's just right alongside the Thanksgiving turkey.


Storing
It's really best to eat this as soon as it's ready. However, if you’ve got leftovers, you can scoop them out of the pumpkin, mix them up, cover, and chill them; reheat them the next day.


Variations
Instead of bread, use cooked rice—when it's baked, it's almost risotto-like. And, with either bread or rice, on different occasions I've added cooked spinach, kale, chard, or peas (the peas came straight from the freezer). I’ve made it without bacon (a wonderful vegetarian dish), and I’ve also made it and loved, loved, loved it with cooked sausage meat; cubes of ham are also a good idea. Nuts are a great addition, as are chunks of apple or pear or pieces of chestnut.


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Garlic and Celeriac Mashed Spuds (adapted from Robin Miller)

2 1/2 pounds potatoes, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
1 celeriac (about 1/2 pound), peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
4 cloves garlic, peeled
3/4 cup lowfat buttermilk
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 tablespoons minced fresh chives
Salt and ground black pepper

In a large saucepan, combine potatoes, celeriac and garlic cloves. Pour over enough water to cover and set pan over high heat. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium and simmer 10 minutes, until potatoes are fork-tender.

Drain and transfer potatoes, celeriac and garlic to a large bowl. Add buttermilk and olive oil and mash until smooth (or lumpy, whatever you like!). Fold in chives. Season, to taste, with salt and black pepper.


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Brussels Sprouts Gratin (from Claire Robinson)

1 1/2 pounds Brussels sprouts, trimmed
3 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons unbleached all-purpose flour
2 cups milk, at room temperature
Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper
5 ounces Gruyere, grated (about 1 cup grated)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over medium heat. Add the Brussels sprouts and cook for 5 to 7 minutes, until bright green and beginning to soften. Remove the sprouts with a slotted spoon and drop into a bowl of ice water to stop the cooking process.

Make the sauce by melting the butter and flour together in a saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring, until smooth and bubbling, about 1 minute; slowly whisk in milk and continue to cook, whisking frequently, until thick and creamy, 2 to 3 minutes. Season the sauce well with salt and heavily with pepper.

Halve the Brussels sprouts through the core and put them in an even layer in a 2 quart baking dish. Pour the sauce over the sprouts and sprinkle the cheese evenly over the top. Bake in the center of the oven for 10 to 15 minutes until the top is golden and bubbling.

 

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French Apple Tart (from Ina Garten)

For the pastry:
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon sugar
12 tablespoons (11/2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, diced
1/2 cup ice water


For the apples:
4 Granny Smith apples or another tart, crisp apple
1/2 cup sugar
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) cold unsalted butter, small diced
1/2 cup apricot jelly or warm sieved apricot jam
2 tablespoons Calvados, rum, or water

For the pastry, place the flour, salt, and sugar in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade. Pulse for a few seconds to combine. Add the butter and pulse 10 to 12 times, until the butter is in small bits the size of peas. With the motor running, pour the ice water down the feed tube and pulse just until the dough starts to come together. Dump onto a floured board and knead quickly into a ball. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper.

Roll the dough slightly larger than 10 by 14-inches. Using a ruler and a small knife, trim the edges. Place the dough on the prepared sheet pan and refrigerate while you prepare the apples.

Peel the apples and cut them in half through the stem. Remove the stems and cores with a sharp knife and a melon baler. Slice the apples crosswise in 1/4-inch thick slices. Place overlapping slices of apples diagonally down the middle of the tart and continue making diagonal rows on both sides of the first row until the pastry is covered with apple slices. (I tend not to use the apple ends in order to make the arrangement beautiful.) Sprinkle with the full 1/2 cup of sugar and dot with the butter.

Bake for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until the pastry is browned and the edges of the apples start to brown. Rotate the pan once during cooking. If the pastry puffs up in one area, cut a little slit with a knife to let the air out. Don't worry! The apple juices will burn in the pan but the tart will be fine! When the tart's done, heat the apricot jelly together with the Calvados and brush the apples and the pastry completely with the jelly mixture. Loosen the tart with a metal spatula so it doesn't stick to the paper. Allow to cool and serve warm or at room temperature.

 

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